Viewing entries tagged
climate change

MARINA in Currents!

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MARINA in Currents!

MARINA lab students Brittany Hoedemaker, Katy Dalton, and Samantha Farquhar authored posts for SMEA’s “Currents” blog during Winter quarter. Check out their pieces below!

Brittany Hoedemaker: Weather, Climate, and Global Warming: Does Terminology Really Matter?” (Feb. 2019) and “The Dirty Truth About Clean Beauty” (March 2019)

Katy Dalton & Samantha Farquhar: Ice, Ice…Maybe?” (April 2019)

Katy Dalton: It’s not all via-doom and gloom: things are looking up for Seattle’s waterfront” (March 2019)

Cover photo from UW SMEA “Currents” page

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Five community characteristics that increase adaptive capacity in the face of climate change

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Five community characteristics that increase adaptive capacity in the face of climate change

This past week, Professor Allison co-authored a new paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change. 

The paper, led by Josh Cinner, proposes an approach to increasing tropical coastal communities' ability to adapt to climate change through five domains. While governments, development agencies, and civil society have made substantial investments in minimizing the impact of climate change on human well-being, to date, these investments have been targeted towards a narrow understanding of adaptive capacity. 

Below are the five key community characteristics that Professor Allison and co-authors found increase adaptive capacity of communities. Excerpts beside each characteristic are quotes from the authors originally included in a news piece covering the paper in Science Daily:

  1. Access to assets to draw upon in times of need. "These assets can include household wealth or public goods such as health services, but they need to be developed in ways that don't exacerbate existing inequalities";
  2. Flexibility to change. "Having some flexibility can enable people to minimise losses or even take advantage of climate-related change," said Prof. Eddie Allison... "For example, fishers might need to change fishing grounds or target new species."
  3. Knowledge of climate change effects and adaptation options. "People need to learn about new techniques and strategies that can help them cope with changing circumstances," said Prof. Katrina Brown at the University of Exeter, UK.
  4. Strong social relationships. "The formal and informal relationships that people have with each other and their communities can help them deal with change by providing social support and access to both knowledge and resources," said Prof. Cinner.
  5. Empowerment to make choices for themselves. "We also need to ensure that people have the ability to determine what is right for them," said Prof. Brown."

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Hack-a-thon Meets Design to Communicate Ocean Climate Change

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Hack-a-thon Meets Design to Communicate Ocean Climate Change

Recently Professor Allison provided expert opinion to participants of a Design Swarm - a day-long, highly-structured brainstorming intensive - dedicated to designing strategies to communicate the critical, complex, and often invisible issue of ocean climate change. Designed by ex-Microsoft executive, Surya Vanka, the Design Swarm takes a fast-paced, no holds-barred approach to inspiring creativity, by suppressing natural inhibitions that can be counter-productive to the creative process. Read more about the event in a blog written by MARINA student and Design Swarm attendee, Hannah Bassett on the webpage of supporters of the event, Nereus Program, based out of the University of British Columbia.

 

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Allison and Bassett review paper on climate change, oceans and societies published in Science

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Allison and Bassett review paper on climate change, oceans and societies published in Science

Professor Allison and Graduate Student and Research Assistant, Hannah Bassett, authored a review paper published in Science this past week. The paper, "Climate change in the oceans: Human impacts and responses" was part of a special issue of Science dedicated to informing the upcoming COP21 meeting in Paris. 

The 2015 Paris Climate Conference, or COP21, will convene 195 countries with the aim of achieving a legally binding and universal agreement to keep global warming below 2°C. Prior COP meetings have been significant historically, with adoption of the Kyoto Protocol taking place at COP3 and initiation of the Green Climate Fund occurring at COP17 in Durban.

In the review, Allison and Bassett discuss impacts of ocean climate change on societies, societal responses, and possible roles of the ocean in climate change mitigation and adaptation. As a call to action, they draw attention to the need for increased climate science and policy that focuses on effects of climate change on the oceans, human systems and their interactions.

The release of this paper was covered in UW Today and the full paper can be accessed here

 

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Allison paper on adaptive capacity published in Nature Climate Change

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Allison paper on adaptive capacity published in Nature Climate Change

Eddie Allison’s latest paper, “Changes in adaptive capacity of Kenyan fishing communities” was published in Nature Climate Change yesterday.

The research conducted by Professor Allison and his colleagues shows how indicators of adaptive capacity within a particular livelihood group are socially differentiated by age, migrant status and participation, and whether they changed amongst the sampled population over time. The results suggest that community-level interventions such as provision of infrastructure or services such as credit facilities may help to increase aspects of adaptive capacity over time. The information gathered from this study aids in the understanding of the determinants of human vulnerability.

Full Citation: Cinner JE, Huchery C, Hicks CC, Daw TM, Marshall N, Wamukota A, Allison EH. Changes in adaptive capacity of Kenyan fishing communities. Nature Climate Change 29 June 2015. doi:10.1038/nclimate2690

This announcement was originally posted on the website of the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

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