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Sam Farquhar

MARINA in Currents!

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MARINA in Currents!

MARINA lab students Brittany Hoedemaker, Katy Dalton, and Samantha Farquhar authored posts for SMEA’s “Currents” blog during Winter quarter. Check out their pieces below!

Brittany Hoedemaker: Weather, Climate, and Global Warming: Does Terminology Really Matter?” (Feb. 2019) and “The Dirty Truth About Clean Beauty” (March 2019)

Katy Dalton & Samantha Farquhar: Ice, Ice…Maybe?” (April 2019)

Katy Dalton: It’s not all via-doom and gloom: things are looking up for Seattle’s waterfront” (March 2019)

Cover photo from UW SMEA “Currents” page

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Farquhar Awarded Academic Year FLAS for French and Canadian studies

Samantha Farquhar has been studying Canada’s national and international marine conservation commitments with the help of the FLAS. Her work has been focused on Canada’s promise to protect 10 percent of its marine and coastal areas by 2020 through the designation of “other effective area-based conservation measures” or OECMs. These areas differ from traditional MPAs, but to what extent they differ is debated, as has the meanings of “conservation” and “protected” areas. Farquhar has become comfortable with the French language through her FLAS, allowing her to work with the Government of Canada and other intergovernmental organizations.

Photos taken by Sam Farquhar

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Farquhar Awarded a Fulbright

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Farquhar Awarded a Fulbright

Sam Farquhar has been awarded a Fulbright to Madagascar to study the social impacts of recent shifts in fisheries policy and the designation of a locally managed marine area. She will be working alongside Blue Ventures for 9 months from March to December in the Barren Isles.  

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Farquhar attends Human Sea Conference at University of Nantes, France (Oct 15-17)

Sam Farquhar presented work with coauthor Maria Santos of the New University of Lisbon regarding  innovative ways synergy can be promoted and streamlined between the conservation of marine living resources and the conservation of  nonliving (cultural) resources through the framework of international commitments like the Aichi Targets and Sustainable Development Goals. Sam received a $750 award from the College of the Environment to attend this meeting.

Sam speaking at the Human Sea Conference

Sam speaking at the Human Sea Conference

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Summer research round-up: Sam Farquhar

Sam on a hike in Italy

Sam on a hike in Italy

This summer has been a blur. For seven weeks, I found myself in Quebec City studying French alongside Canadian fisheries policy. I was primarily exploring Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO) innovative decision to count fisheries closures as the first ‘other effective area-based conservation measure’ (or OECM). OECMs are areas in which biodiversity conservation is not the the primary objective, but still occurs as a result of the management in place. For example, some military restricted areas, protected archaeological sites, and spiritual areas are shown to have high biodiversity values even though that was not the main goal of the establishment of these areas. OECMs will be included as a type of protected area in the future highlighting their potential to increase ecological habitat representation and connectivity, and recognizing the diversity of stakeholders who contribute to conservation areas.

When Canada counted their fisheries closures as OECMs, they also counted them towards their national conservation goals sparking some debate. Conservationists argued that fisheries closures couldn’t be counted as protected areas, because the areas are not implemented for the long term and allow some use.  Luckily, while in Quebec, I had the opportunity to meet Dr. Amber Himes-Cornell, a SMEA affiliate professor and principal investigator of OECMS for the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Between meeting with Dr. Himes-Cornell and members of DFO in Montreal, I learned a lot more about the arguments surrounding OECMs. A main factor that was emphasized to me was that there is very little guidance available for defining what an OECM is and determining how to assess it.

At the same time I was in Montreal, the Convention of Biological Diversity’s 22nd Subsidiary Body on Scientific,Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) Meeting was occurring and OECMs happened to be an agenda item. It was at this meeting that an official definition for OECMs was actually drafted. Going forward, this definition, along with associated recommendations and criteria for identifying OECMs, will be reviewed and possibly adopted at the next Conference of the Parties (COP) meeting this November.

From Canada, I went directly to Rome to continue my work on OECMs under the supervision of Dr. Himes-Cornell. Armed with an officially drafted OECMs definition, recommendations, and criteria for assessing and identifying,, I studied the implications, and logistics of  counting OECMs towards global conservation goals (namely, 10% of the oceans protected by 2020). Additionally, I worked to interpret the criteria set forth at the SBSTTA meeting in order to clarify what an OECM is and what it is not. I even had the pleasure of grabbing a beer with Eddie while he was visiting the FAO.

Overall, this has been an incredibly memorable summer. I look forward to taking everything I have learned and writing my thesis upon my return to Seattle!

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