Viewing entries in
MARINA news

MARINA at IMBeR Future Oceans2

Comment

MARINA at IMBeR Future Oceans2

Former and current MARINA lab members are in Brest, France at the IMBeR Future Oceans2 Open Science Conference.

Eddie gave a keynote speech on the blue economy and the future of the oceans. He will also give a talk on social ecological systems. Zelin Chen presented a lightning talk on Chinese crab fisheries management, and Hannah Bassett and Zach Koehn are scheduled to present later in the conference.

UW is also represented at Future Oceans2 by Ben Fitzhugh, of UW's Anthropology Department
and George Hunt of SAFS, and by former SMEA/MARINA alum Ben Everard.

Comment

Sustainable seafood journey in Seattle

Comment

Sustainable seafood journey in Seattle

Authors: Pei, Sallie, and Zelin

To promote more sustainable use of marine resources, it is important to educate the public on where the seafood they see on their plate comes from and how the fishing industries will affect the environment. In Asia, education on fish in food culture has gained more and more attention as one of the major environmental outreach themes. Ecotourism is the main pathway to promote education and enhance public awareness related to fish in food culture. Further practices are expected to be involved in education like fish to school program.

With an interest in exploring examples of sustainable seafood practices and education outreach in the U.S. West Coast,  Pei, Sallie, and Zelin launched an initiative to synthesize the what people on the U. S. West Coast have done to enhance seafood sustainability in the region. They shared their findings in the popular publication in Taiwan known as the Fishery Promotion Magazine under Taiwan Fishery Agency, Council of Agriculture.  

While they did enjoy the fun of doing desktop research together to review sustainable seafood education and outreach projects such as the Community Supported Aquaculture, Seafood Watch and, Alaska State-Fish to Schools Program, Pei, Sallie, and Zelin also went on an adventure for the project. They visited popular grocery stores and supermarkets like Safeway, Trader Joe’s and QFC, and to see if they could easily trace the source, fishing method, and fish stock information of fresh, frozen and processed seafood available at the store. The team also visited the first sustainable seafood sushi bar- Mashiko Sushi, and tasted the delicious seafood there. Their findings on seafood traceability and their thoughts on Mashiko Sushi is can also be found in the article.

This journey and resulting publication was a way to commemorate the deep friendship that blossomed between the three students from Taiwan, Hongkong, and China, and to demonstrate the importance of  perspective exchange and cultural communications.



Comment

Building a Bridge Between Business Fishermen and The General Public

Comment

Building a Bridge Between Business Fishermen and The General Public

The contribution of the fishery is not just the benefit from the industry, but also a culture, belief and lifestyle. Taiwan has one of the highest densities of fishing ports in the world, with a fishing port every 7.5 kilometers. However, the business fishery is still mysterious for most people, as most don’t know a lot about how different fishing methods work, what kind of species make up the seafood market, how the fishing activity affects our marine environment, and what kind of fishery management regulations exist.

At the same time, although Taiwan has taken conservation measures for coastal and offshore fishery resources in recent years, the effectiveness of resources rebuilding is unclear. Many initiatives, such as marine protected areas (MPAs), are frequently opposed by fishermen. Therefore, to listen to the fisherman's voice is an important way to bridge the gap between the general public. Sustainable use may enable the public to provide more insightful advice on conservation and sustainable industrial development.

Pei reviewed management measures and interviewed 313 fishermen by purposive stratification and snowball sampling in past two years in northern Taiwan, and found there were different perceptions of threat in different groups of fishermen (age, fishing effort and fishing method), which may cause a negative impact to the marine fishery resources and the different opinions toward fishery management regulation.

Pei conducts surveys in Taiwan in efforts to understand the perception of threat to fisheries.

Pei conducts surveys in Taiwan in efforts to understand the perception of threat to fisheries.



Comment

MARINA in Currents!

Comment

MARINA in Currents!

MARINA lab students Brittany Hoedemaker, Katy Dalton, and Samantha Farquhar authored posts for SMEA’s “Currents” blog during Winter quarter. Check out their pieces below!

Brittany Hoedemaker: Weather, Climate, and Global Warming: Does Terminology Really Matter?” (Feb. 2019) and “The Dirty Truth About Clean Beauty” (March 2019)

Katy Dalton & Samantha Farquhar: Ice, Ice…Maybe?” (April 2019)

Katy Dalton: It’s not all via-doom and gloom: things are looking up for Seattle’s waterfront” (March 2019)

Cover photo from UW SMEA “Currents” page

Comment